Chris F.A. Johnson

Updating my books

My publisher, APress, has asked me to prepare 2nd editions of both my books, Pro Bash Programming and Shell Scripting Recipes.

That should keep me busy for most of the year!

Websites that work

I am a web designer, developer, and coder in Toronto, Ontario, Canada.

I produce accessible web sites that work in any standards-compliant browser, in any size of window, under any operating system.

My sites follow the KISS principle, so that you will be able to maintain your own site without a complicated content management system. You will get a tutorial on how to create your own pages using a template I’ll provide.

See the Toronto web design page for more information.

Word Finder

The word finder and anagram solver began when my hard disk drive failed and I didn't have the money to replace it (SCSI drives were not cheap). The drive contained the software I used for composing crossword puzzles.

I had just started my first web site, and the host gave shell access. I uploaded my word lists to the shell account and wrote a couple of Unix shell scripts to replace my Amiga software.

After I learned about CGI programming for the Web, I wrote an HTML front end for the scripts, and the WordFinder was born.

My Books

My second book, Pro Bash Programming: Scripting the GNU/Linux Shell was published by Apress in October 2009. The book is a programming tutorial using bash (the Bourne-again shell) as the programming language.

My previous book, Shell Scripting Recipes: A Problem-Solution Approach is a collection of (mostly) POSIX shell scripts. It is still available through on-line booksellers.

Cryptic Crosswords

I have been composing cryptic crossword puzzles for more than 30 years. My puzzles have appeared in various publications, beginning with the University of Toronto alumni magazine, The Graduate, in 1979. They currently appear in Good Times, the Canadian Magazine for Successful Retirement.

PostScript

WebCentric logo

For several years, I have been using the PostScript page description language to create graphics for my web pages. I use a text editor (GNU emacs) to write the code and a gv window to display the resulting image; gv updates the display every time the file changes.

In 2008, I entered a logo I created on the spur of the moment into a contest for a local MeetUp group. I was surprised that mine was chosen.

I cleaned it up and posted the code along with examples of possible variations to the WebCentric logo.